Quantity of Writing in Social Media

Last week I co-facilitated a Media Literacy Institute. As we discussed ways of integrating movies, television, pop culture, games and social media into classrooms I reflected on my own use of social media in classrooms (I gamified some of the lessons asking for Twitter posts, so I actively encouraged social media use).

As I finish preparation for my next course – Teacher as Writer – I’m rereading Yancey’s On Reflection. This is helping me reflect on the MLI and project forward to the classroom space i’m creating for the next course. This reflection space is interesting and complex for me. Yancey’s discussions of reflection return to ways of using reflective assignments and reflective teaching to help strengthen student understanding of their own writing – to help students develop agency over their writing to increase their comfort when confronted with various school and real-life writing situations (tons of important room for student recognition of the rhetorical situation as part of this pedagogy).

For these two grad classes, I’m teaching mostly K-12 teachers. So I’m reflecting on my practices, my pedagogies, and the ways I helped students at the MLI develop their own understanding of writing and media literacy. Additionally, this course was attended by K-12 educators who can use these principles in their future classroom spaces, so as I reflect on my classroom practices I must also reflect on how I created a reflective space for teachers to consider their applications of the assignment they experienced during the week. Since my next class has a similar student population, I’m then projecting forward to how to create a reflective space where educators both learn the course content (writing) and consider ways of integrating the principles covered in their future classrooms. Educator training is such a complex mix of content and modeling.

Back to the main title – as I’m considering this reflective space of content, modeling and reflection, I was also reading about social media as we discussed these spaces at the MLI. Most articles I read last week about the direction of Facebook and Twitter reported the number of unique accounts created each day as proof of the health of the spaces. While I understand that a new person becomes age eligible to create an account everyday, is new account creation a valuable measure of social media health? This afternoon I looked at my Twitter API data scraper for the MLI and noticed the number of unique tweets created – over 1200. This led to my question for this post (that took me forever to get to) is the amount of writing important when social media is used in a classroom?

In most of my semester long courses, I require students to post 2-3x per week (depending on number of course meetings) as a sign of engagement with the course and with the course curriculum. For the MLI, a Twitter account was necessary, pre-posts were required, a gamified curriculum offered, and yet not everyone in the class posted on Twitter. Is that necessarily a sign of engagement failure, or a sign of lack of comfort with a specific social media tool.

Again, returning to numbers, what if anything does over 1200 unique posts, most during the week of the Institute mean? It shows we did a LOT of writing – which is a YAY to my Rhet/Comp heart. It’s a solid number for representing trending topics in the twitterverse, but is that meaningful. The measure so often associated with Twitter – trending hashtags, large quantities of posts – appears as valuable data in most API scrapers. But, from an educator standpoint, as I reflect back and project forward, is this meaningful data? Am I, in ignoring the ‘meaningful measures’ subverting the designed use of this social media space, or simply using the affordances to meet my pedagogical goals.

Ultimately, I want to be more reflective in the classroom space about our Twitter usage. I want my students to recognize their contributions, not just fulfill course requirements. For the MLI this reflections and projection related mostly to ways of integrating Twitter or a similar back channel in K-12 learning spaces. But we didn’t always connect this back to pedagogical goals, and possible sites of subversion of the designed affordances. Would that be helpful?

Like usual, I have no answers for my questions, but as a scholar working on a pedagogical piece on Twitter I need to reflect on what I’m doing, what Twitter thinks I’m doing, and how my students work within this space in the classroom.

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